The entrance to the Department of History’s office in Sidney Smith Hall
 

Undergraduate 

Course Designators

Below are descriptions of courses with the following ‘designators’ (the 3 letter code in front of the course number):

Course Prefix Department
HIS Department of History
JHP Joint History and Political Science
(administered by the Political Science Department, Room 3018, Sidney Smith Hall)
NMC Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations
(administered by the Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations, 4 Bancroft Avenue)
SII/XBC Society and Its Institutions: Cross-Breadth Category, First Year Seminars (First-Year Seminars [courses with '199' in their codes] are open only to newly-admitted Faculty of Arts and Science students.)

NOTE: All courses shown on this page are accepted towards a History program (except SII & XBC199Y1 courses). However, as shown above, they are not all administered by the Department of History.

Course Nomenclature

  • Y1-Y is a full course, both terms
  • Y1-F is a full course, first term (fall session)
  • Y1-S is a full course, second term (winter session)
  • H1-F is a half course, first term (fall session)
  • H1-S is a half course, second term (winter session)

100 Level Courses (2017-2018)

100-level HIS courses are designed for students entering university. They take a broad sweep of material, and introduce students to the methods and techniques of university study. Each week, students will attend two lectures given by the course professor, and participate in one tutorial led by a teaching assistant. First year courses are not considered to be in an ‘area’ for program requirements.

No student may take more than one 100-level HIS course, but ALL students enrolled in a History Specialist, Joint Specialist, Major, or Minor program must take ONE 100-level HIS course.

The Department also offers at least two XBC199Y seminar courses each year (see course descriptions below). These are limited to 20 students each. Some previous courses offered by the History Department include "Film on History – History on Film", "Comparative First-Wave Feminism", "African Roots: The African Slave Trade in the Diaspora". You will work more closely with the professor and other students, and gain a more intense training in historical methods. Normally, the XBC199Y courses cannot be used to fulfil program requirements, but they can be used as breadth requirements. For more information, consult the First Year Seminar Booklet, which will be available during registration.

People have made the Arctic home for millennia, creating circumpolar cultures in its challenging climate. This course compares and examines connections in the contested polar region through several themes: cultures in contact, trade and exploration, environment crime and punishment, and defense and sovereignty.

Exclusion: any 100-level HIS course

Instructor: A. Smith/H. Bohaker Lecture: MW 2 Tutorials: TBA Pre-Modern: ½ credit

Interactions among peoples, empires, and cultures, with particular attention to the non-European world. Can we speak of “international relations” before the modern concept of nation-states was established? What forms did globalization take in the pre-modern era? Covering a broad chronological sweep we will look at exchanges of goods and technologies; dissemination of ideas and religions; voyages of migration and exploration; and episodes of conquest and colonization.

Exclusion: any 100-level HIS course

Instructor: C. Chin Lecture: TR 3 Tutorials: TBA Pre-Modern: ½ credit

An analysis of the development of the international system from the 1750s to the present day. The course will highlight, in particular, the varying roles of war, diplomacy, and trade in changing, maintaining, and expanding the international system. It will consider wars in Europe, North America, Asia and South Asia, Africa, and several conflicts that were global in scope. Conflict will be considered from several perspectives: as the source and guardian of international order; as an agent of change within the system; as a tool of expansion; and as a threat to the survival of system and its human inhabitants. Appropriate attention will be paid to the contributions made by individuals, ideas, technology, and institutions to the evolution of international order.

Exclusion: any 100-level HIS course. HIS103Y1 does not count as a distribution requirement course in any category.

Instructor: T. Sayle Lecture: MW 2 Tutorials: TBA Pre-Modern: ½ credit

An analysis of the development of the international system from the 1750s to the present day. The course will highlight, in particular, the varying roles of war, diplomacy, and trade in changing, maintaining, and expanding the international system. It will consider wars in Europe, North America, Asia and South Asia, Africa, and several conflicts that were global in scope. Conflict will be considered from several perspectives: as the source and guardian of international order; as an agent of change within the system; as a tool of expansion; and as a threat to the survival of system and its human inhabitants. Appropriate attention will be paid to the contributions made by individuals, ideas, technology, and institutions to the evolution of international order

Exclusion: any 100-level HIS course

HIS103Y1 does not count as a distribution requirement course in any category.

Instructor: TBA Lecture: M 6-8 Tutorials: TBA Pre-Modern: ½ credit

This course introduces the history of the African Diaspora in the Americas, from the period of exploration to the age of revolutions (1492-1804). Lectures and readings, will draw from primary sources and historical scholarship to focus on a range of topics, including slavery and the slave trade, race relations, gender and sexuality, religious and cultural practices, and liberation struggles.

Exclusion: any 100-level HIS course

Instructor: T. Walker Lecture: TR 3 Tutorials: TBA Pre-Modern: 1 credit

Description to come.

Instructor: N.Everett Lecture: W 10-12 Breadth category: 3 Society and Its Institutions

Description to come.

Instructor: V. Dimitriadis Lecture: T 5-7 Breadth category: 3 Society and Its Institutions